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Abramtsevo Estate

Established during the second half of the 19th century, Abramtsevo is a vivid example of a provincial estate. In appearance many Abramtsevo structures remind us of ancient Russian architecture. They include: the Savior Church which is similar in design to the ancient churches of Pskov and Novgorod, and the tent-shaped bath house which is adorned with intricately carved decor. The theme of Russian culture is further reinforced by the pavilion called “A Hut on Chicken Legs.” It was built to resemble the folk image of the house of the fairy-tale witch known as Baba Yaga.

One of the former owners of the estate was the Russian writer Sergei Aksakov. It is believed he wrote his famous fairy-tale, “The Scarlet Flower,” when he lived here. Another high profile owner of the estate was Savva Mamontov, an industrialist and prominent patron of the arts. During the time he owned the estate, Abramtsevo often saw such celebrated painters as Ilya Repin, Mikhail Vrubel and Vasily Palenov, who came to the estate for inspiration as well as to work. In 1889 an experimental art studio was established on the grounds of the estate in order to recreate the secrets of Russian majolica. Today Abramtsevo’s famous majolica decorates many Russian mansions and cathedrals. Nowadays, Abramtsevo with its area of 50 hectares hosts a historic, literary and art museum-preserve.

Address: Moscow Region, Sergiyevo-Posadsky district, township of Khotkovo, the village of Abramtsevo, 1 Muzeinaya street

Hours of Operation: Wed–Fri 10 am – 6 pm; Sat 10 am – 8 pm; Sun 10 am – 6 pm

Web-site: www.abramtsevo.net

Phones: 8 (496) 543-24-70, 8-916-278-45-42

Directions: by local train from the Yaroslavsky train station to the Abramtsevo station, continue 2 km on foot or from the Khotkovo station by bus or shuttle van #55; by car down the Yaroslavskoe highway, turn left at the sign to Leshkovo and Radonezh, continue to Khotkovo, turn to Abramtsevo and then down the main road to the museum-preserve (some 65 km)